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10 Tips to Get A Job At Companies like Google, Facebook, Amazon

Since many big tech firms are moving recently to Canada to cities like Toronto, Montreal Calgary and Vancouver, you will need the following 10 tips to get a job at one of these big tech firms.

1. Prepare To Wait

Millions of candidates apply to big tech firms every year. On average it takes about 8-12 weeks to receive a job offer if you are selected. Let that sink it – that’s 2-3 months after you start your interviews to get your offer. So make sure you have a job otherwise you will wait for a long time to pass all the interviews. Some of our bigger clients average 8 interviews where it starts with HR interview, and then goes to another 6-7 interviews with developers, leads, managers, VPs, etc.

2. Apply, apply, apply

Even if you do not meet all the requirements, apply anyways. Big tech firms go above and beyond to find a diamond in the rough. So even if you do not have that GoLang requirement but been developing with python apply anyways. If you are good at what you do, hiring manager will try to find a way to hire you.

Be open with recruiter of what you want, and be ready to explain what you have achieved so far in your career.

3. Keep it Simple

Most larger tech firms invested millions into their HR / AI software. However if your resume is illegible , has tables all over the place, or over 3 pages long, sometimes that automatic CV parser would not be able to auto read it and most likely mark it as spam or trash. Make sure you use PDF and or Word resume. Use bullet points for the ease of reading the resume. Your formatting has to be easily understood as most recruiters only spend 10-15 seconds before deciding whether to give you a call or discard your resume.

4. Many Interviews

Be prepared a lot of technical testing. On average bigger tech firms do anywhere from 5 to 8. On top of technical coding challenges you will be asked to “grab a coffee” so the hiring managers and leads can get to know you. Good idea would be to research the person who will be interviewing you to try to estimate what questions will be asked. And most importantly, make sure you go in refreshed and ready to adapt and react.

5. Common Interview Questions at Big Tech Firms

These three questions always come up – so be prepared with an answer:
a) Why are you interested in the job?
b) What are your biggest accomplishments? Explain
c) What are you passionate about? Time to talk about that Fiji hiking trip you did.

6. Dream big, no no even bigger

Big tech loves big dreamers. Your eCommerce idea about selling shoes online might be a good one, but you need to make it 100 or even 1000 times bigger. Big tech caters to millions and billions of users, they want you to think big also. So make it big.

7. Hobbies anyone?

Have a cool hobby? Big tech firms want to hear about your passions. Do you build drones in your spare time? Tell them about that – but do not show off too much. Be modest.

8. Show Interest and Take notes

Buy notepad! and take some notes when doing interviews with big tech. That will show to the hiring manager that you are paying attention and curious. Ask questions – be curious!

9. Social Media

All big tech will do a social media search on you. So be prepared with updated LinkedIn profile, make sure you contribute to GitHub, and share some interesting ideas on Twitter, and for god-sake remove those skinny dipping pics from Facebook.

10. Thank you

Over 80% of candidates do not do this! Send thank you emails to all the interviewers you’ve met. Do not wait – send it the same or next day. Highlight your experience and express your interest in the job. It is so simple, and will give you a definite boost over many other candidates.

Facebook Scolds Canada

Canadian regulators said that Facebook’s weak privacy protection was to blame for millions of users’ data being exposed.

Canadian privacy commissionaire said that Facebook broke national and provincial regulations when it came to sharing user data with third parties.

Facebook flat-out refused to agree with the Canadian government’s legal findings and refused audits of its privacy procedures.

Daniel Therrien, The Privacy Commissioner of Canada, told New York Times:

“They told us outright that they do not agree with our legal findings. I find that absolutely untenable that a company can tell a regulator that it does not respect its findings.”

Therrien said that they will be taking Facebook to Canadian federal court but he acknowledges that even if Facebook is found guilty due to Canadian law system , it might only be fined few thousand dollars.

Facebook was not happy with Therrien’s announcement and released the following statement:

“After many months of good-faith cooperation and lengthy negotiations, we are disappointed. There’s no evidence that Canadians’ data was shared with Cambridge Analytica, and we’ve made dramatic improvements to our platform to protect people’s personal information.”

While Canada might impose penalties against Facebook in the future there are most likely be puny when compares to up to $5 billion dollars that might be imposed against them by Federal Trade Commission for privacy violations.

Therrien said he is not happy with a current system and is worried because some 622,000 Canadians may have been affected by personal data exposure. Therrien said that he wants better privacy laws in Canada as well as a way for regulators penalize companies.

Canada never adopted stiff penalties like many other European countries.

Canadian Govt Eyes Regulating Facebook, Other Tech

The Canadian government said it might start regulating social media and other tech companies like Facebook, Google, Amazon and Twitter in Canada soon.

Minister of Democratic Institutions, Karina Gould, mentioned that she thinks that Canadians are fed up with tech giants and want the government to do something about it.

Gould’s announcement is coincided with many other countries attempts at cracking down on social media.

Recently countries like UK and Australia passed a very stringent laws against social medias. Most of these laws cover how the social media should handle “online harms” and how expeditiously they suppose to take it down. In Australia for example if content is not removed fast enough, Facebook execs could face jail time.

Taylor Owen, an associate professor at McGill, in his interview with The Toronto Star, mentioned that government has to tread carefully as te government starts to introduce new restrictive laws.

“We better get the democratic governance right if we have any hope of pushing back against the autocratic model.”

Taylor Owen, an associate professor at McGill

Mark Zuckerberg is founder and chief executive of Facebook, agrees with the notion in his op-ed in Wall Street Journal.

I believe we need a more active role for governments and regulators. By updating the rules for the Internet, we can preserve what’s best about it — the freedom for people to express themselves and for entrepreneurs to build new things — while also protecting society from broader harms.

From what I’ve learned, I believe we need new regulation in four areas: harmful content, election integrity, privacy and data portability.

Mark Zuckerberg, founder and chief executive, Facebook

Spokesman for Google said no matter what they will continue working with the government to “protect Canada’s democratic institutions and election activities.”

Canadian Official Wants to Break Up Facebook

Facebook ruled out advice about anti-trust regulations from nine governments at meeting in the UK. Mark Zuckerberg declined to attend a meeting instead sending Facebook’s VP.

Charlie Angus, member of Canadian House of Commons, exchanged a fierce debate with Facebook’s VP, Richard Allan, saying among other things:

“The problem is Facebook. The days of the Wild West of Facebook are numbered. What we’re regulating … are the symptoms.

Perhaps the best regulation would be antitrust.”

Angus blamed Facebook for its dominance saying that if someone wants to use another social media they have to use Facebook’s owned Instagram or Whatsapp. He said because Facebook does not have any real competitors they can ignore regulations.

Allan replied:

“Unless you’re going to turn off the internet, I’m not confident that people, the people we serve, you serve, would be better off, in a world where Facebook is not able, however imperfectly, to offer services where we spend 15 years learning how to do it.”

Angus said that he considers Facebook to be a fraud on a massive scale as they stood idle and did nothing.

You can see Angus’s further comments in the video below

Facebook Canada to Fight Fake News

Facebook Canada announced this week that it will be fighting fake news on its platform.

The initiative will be part of Facebook’s Elections Integrity Initiative, in collaboration with Agence France-Presse. Each piece of news will be reviewed in English and French and rated according to its accuracy.

Facebook is trying to shake off its image as fake news provider ever since Russians have interfered with US presidential elections in 2016. Russians have created divisive content on Facebook and Instagram to steer elections. Russian government has denied any wrong doing in this case.

Facebook Canada said that if story is rated as false, it will state so under the article. The articles will be defined as being true, false or offering inaccurate or misleading information. Facebook users “will be informed if a story they shared on Facebook has been rated as false.”

Facebook Canada’s head of public policy, Kevin Chan, said

“The AFP fact-checkers could find [misleading stories] by themselves. They will also rely on individuals, Canadians who are on Facebook, reporting these things to us. The third way, over time, will be [artificial intelligence] tools that will be able to proactively identify them.”

Facebook stock have recently reached an all time high of $201 while Instagram if valued by itself is valued at $100b+.

Canadian Govt is Picking Fight with Facebook, Netflix, others

The federal liberal government is warning technology media companies in Canada to play nice and add Canadian content ASAP or else.

The government announced that they will take 18 months to study how they can force tech companies operating in Canada to add more Canadian content without any cost to Canadians. Meaning at least for now unlike in Quebec, Government of Canada will NOT be adding GST tax to your Netflix bill.

Melanie Joly took a tough stance against foreign media companies in Canada announcing on her twitter.

  • “All players – Google, Amazon, Facebook, Spotify, etc. – that are in the system must contribute to the system. There is no free ride.”
  • “New technology, like streaming services, has changed the way that Canadians connect with each other, do business and discover, access and consume content. Now more than ever, Canadians go online.
  • To keep up with these changes we must modernize our legislative framework so that Canadian artists, artisans, businesses, consumers and broadcasters can adapt and thrive in a changing environment.
  • I announced the launch of the Review of the Broadcasting Act and the Telecommunications Act. A review of the Radiocommunication Act will also be carried out.”

Canadian artists applauded the initiative saying that thousands of jobs and our Canadian identity depend on it.

mojzagrebinfo / Pixabay

Netflix has long resisted to be covered by framework that applies to traditional broadcasters. But Netflix did say that they intend to spend $500m dollars in Canada over the next few years.

Facebook has also resisted to government intervention by caling for fewer not more rules. Kevin Chan, Facebook Canada public policy said:

 “The continued growth of different online video offerings − user-generated or otherwise − depends on a flexible regulatory environment that allows for innovation and experimentation.”

Other experts wondered how the government can restrict businesses passing on the cost to consumer?

Lawson Hunter, a regulatory lawyer and former executive at Bell Canada, said in interview with Globe and Mail:

“It’s hard to expect that you can add cost to any service provider and expect them to say they will swallow it and not pass it on to the consumer. That is not how the market typically works.”

Not everyone was happy with the announcement. Quebec’s left leaning NDP government’s Critic for Culture and Heritage, Pierre Nantel said:

“Netflix makes revenues in Quebec, so it should make investments in French [in Quebec],” said the president of the CRTC.

Subtitle…

Melanie Joly’s “Netflix agreements”, without GST or Franco content, are a cul-de-sac for our culture.”

5 Most Bizarre Questions Congress Asked Zuckerberg

Facebook has been in a hot seat recently due to exposure of between 50 million and 87 million Facebook user profiles without the users’ consent. Mark did a good job last few days showing up at US congress and answering most of their questions. Facebook stock regained over $30 billion back.

Facebook had important questions to answer to the public however these senators didn’t do their homework. Most of the congressman are in their 70s and 80s and not used to computer and tech talk. The questions they asked makes you wonder if they even know how to turn on a computer or even know what Facebook does.

So without further ado here are the 5 most weird questions asked, poor Mark (see videos below):

Number 1: South Carolina Senator Lindsay Graham (R) asked “Is Twitter the same as what you do?”

Confused much? What does she think Facebook runs a monopoly? “It overlaps with a portion of what we do,” Zuckerberg said.

 

Number 2: Georgia Representative Buddy Carter (R) asked “Did you know that the Motion Picture Association of America is having problems with piracy and…this is challenging their existence?”

OK let’s blame all privacy issues on Facebook. Zuckerburg response: “Congressman, I believe that has been an issue for a long time.”

 

Number 3: Hawaii Senator Brian Schatz (D) “If I’m emailing within WhatsApp…does that inform your advertisers?”

Ahhh hold there a second Mr Schatz – you do realize Whatsapp is a chat, and not an email? Mark without correcting him said: “WhatsApp would not lead to related ads.”

 

Number 4: Florida Senator Bill Nelson (D) “What if I don’t want to receive [ads for chocolate]?”

Ahh OK OK – maybe not such a bad question. But its cookie targeted ads used by thousands of websites, not just Facebook. Blame Chrome and IE browsers and their cookies! Mark answered that users can switch off information if they don’t want that info used to select ads for them.

 

Number 5: Utah Senator Orrin Hatch (R) “How do you sustain a business model in which users don’t pay for your service?”

Zuckerburg said “Senator we run ads.”

 

I think my grandma would probably ask more educated questions than these bunch – enjoy the videos below.

Mark Zuckerberg Explains the Internet (to Old People)!

It’d be painful to watch if it wasn’t so funny.

Posted by CNET on Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Confused senators at Mark Zuckerberg’s hearing asked confusing questions

Facebook had important questions to answer. These senators didn’t do their homework.

Posted by ThinkProgress on Tuesday, April 10, 2018