Tag Archives: warehouse

Amazon Is Hiring 15,000 Workers in Canada; Hourly Rate is Starting at Up to $21.65

Amazon Canada is looking to hire 15,000 warehouse workers and to pay up to $21.65 an hour Canadian.

This is a big jump from $16 dollars they were paying just a week ago. All current workers will get a raise of between $1.60 to $2.20 an hour.

“We are growing very rapidly in the country. Our business is expanding a lot, and we want to continue to stay focused on our customers, so we obviously have needs around hiring and retaining top talent.”

Sumegha Kumar

Director of Customer fulfilment operations for Amazon Canada

Amazon Canada is currently employing around 25,000 employees across 46 warehouses in Canada. Amazon is growing rapidly in Canada. Just last year they only had 30 warehouses.

On top of amazing starting salaries – Amazon is also providing the following great benefits:

Health and Benefits

At Amazon, every full-time employee, regardless of their position, level or tenure, has access to the same benefits. Some of those benefits include:

  • Wages from $17 per hour to $21.65 per hour, with a $100 bonus for new and current employees who show proof of vaccination
  • Comprehensive health benefits starting on day one with no waiting period
  • RRSP matching
  • Stock units
  • Kids & Company special packages including a guaranteed spot at Kids & Company Child Care locations within six months of registration, a 10 per cent discount off monthly in-center tuition, waived registration fees, back-up care options and access to virtual workshops and events
  • Employee and Family Assistance Plan provided by LifeWorks and available 24/7 to help Amazon employees and their family members feel supported, by phone, online, and in-person
  • Access to up-skilling training programs that meet employees where they are, through Amazon’s commitment to invest $75M to skills-train 100,000 Amazonians by 2025
  • Additional paid parental leave benefits for eligible employees

Amazon to Hire 600 in Ottawa

Amazon announced this week that they will be building a new sorting warehouse facility in Ottawa about 1 million sq ft, and will require 600 employees to operate it.

On your first day of work at Amazon you will eligible for nice hourly wages, medical / vision / dental coverage, a group RRSP, stock options, and performance-based bonuses.

Director of Amazon Operations in Canada , Glenn Sommerville, said

“Ontario continues to be a great place for Amazon to do business and we look forward to adding a fulfillment centre in the National Capital Region. Our ability to expand in Ontario and create more than 600 new jobs is the result of two things: incredible customers and an outstanding workforce. Amazon is committed to providing great opportunities for employment and creating a positive economic impact for the region.”

Amazon warehouse is set to open in few years, but they will be starting the hiring process soon to hire associates to “pick, pack, and ship large items like household decor, sporting equipment and gardening tools.”

You can watch video about what it’s like to work at Amazon warehouse below

Amazon has about 6,000 employees in Canada, and has announced opening of a big office in Vancouver recently as well.

Newly elected Ontario provincial Premier, Doug Ford, was pleased with the news as well

“We applaud Amazon for making this investment and, we look forward to doing our part to help other top employers create and protect good jobs in our province. Ontario is open for business.”

 

Kitchener Clearpath Robotics’s OTTO Motors makes self driving vehicles for warehouses, raises $55M Canadian to date

OTTO Motors, a division of Clearpath Robotics, provides self-driving vehicles designed exclusively for indoor material transport. The vehicles operate with infrastructure-free navigation, offering intelligent, safe, efficient, and reliable transportation within industrial centers. Proprietary hardware, software, and services are delivered to provide customer excellence.

Who started the company? Do you / team members have tech background?

Clearpath Robotics was founded in 2009 by Ryan Gariepy (CTO), Bryan Webb (COO) and Matt Rendall (CEO). In April 2016, the company launched its industrial division, OTTO Motors, to provide self-driving vehicles for material transport to manufacturing and warehouse operators.

How are you being financed?

Our parent company, Clearpath Robotics, raised its first round of VC funding in March 2015 and its Series B funding in October 2016.

What do you think will be / is a big obstacle to overcome?

Scaling a high-growth company is our biggest challenges. It’s something we’ve had a lot of practice with over the course of our business, but there are always growing pains associated when it comes to scaling up. From improving team communications to efficiently planning inventory stock, there’s a full range of factors that can be impacted when growing a company’s team, product line, and customer base.

How do you go about finding good developers / IT guys for your company?

We’re fortunate to receive over 9,000 applicants each year for the positions we post on Clearpath Robotics and OTTO Motors. We open our application process to prospective team members globally, engage in recruitment activities with local universities, and engage in the online community through social media discussions and recruitment advertising.

How are you intending on taking your company to million dollars in revenues? In what markets?

We were profitable within 18 months of inception and now we’re a multi-million dollar organization. Addressing the market needs to ensure a product-market fit is our number focus, and we do this by listening to our customers and iterating on products and solutions quickly to ensure we provide the highest value possible. Expanding with our industrial division was an important strategic move for us since OTTO Motors serves a very separate market (ie: manufacturers in industry) than the Clearpath Robotics business (i.e: researchers in academia).

What is the big lesson you’ve learned (success or failure) with this project.

The biggest lesson we’ve learned is how to manage growth, yet with more growth, comes more growing pains. So although we’ve learned a lot, there is always more to gain!